Tag Archives: event app

Event App for Zukunft Personal trade show with networking features just launched

Today, we launched the new app for the leading trade show for human resource management, HRM Expo (Zukunft Personal), taking place 14-16 October 2014 in Cologne.

Besides the event schedule (with reminder functions), the exhibitor lists and floor plans, the app has quite some interesting networking features.App_ZukunftPersonal

Users can login with their LinkedIn, Twitter or Facebook profiles, send each others private messages and contribute to a timeline in Facebook-style. Thus, attendees and exhibitors can get in touch with each other already before the show, share their impressions from the show floor and take part in quick polls inside the app.

Other nice features are that you can use the app also in offline mode, once you have finished the app download. That makes it easy to plan your trip, the exhibitors you want to meet and the sessions you want to attend while on the plane or in other locations with limited connectivity.

As I stated in one of my previous blog posts about current app usage trends, I believe it is necessary to give your target audience a good reason to download your app. Judging by the take-up that happened already on day one of the app launch, it seems we have hit the right tone.

On top of things, we managed to offset the cost by a sponsor already with the first edition.

Click here to download the app in case you want to give it a try (available for iOS and Android). The app is based on the technology by the provider Attendify.

Latest app usage statistics – What do they mean for event apps?

Screenshot at Sep. 09 21-04-51

At first glance, the bare figures that Comscore have revealed last week can be pretty discouraging for event app providers – as well as for organizers implementing an app for their conference, exhibition or event.

The full report can be viewed here, but let me summarize the key findings:

  1. In Germany, two thirds of the 40 million smartphone users haven’t downloaded a single app during the last month! People have become reluctant to add more and more apps to their phones.
  2. Du to the fact that smartphone penetration is still on the rise, the app economy is growing, but at a decreasing rate. Market saturation is coming nearer.
  3. While downloads are decreasing, internet usage via mobile apps is on the rise. In the USA, digital media time spent on mobile apps is already at 52%! People have their favorite apps that they use more and more often.
  4. Overall, digital media time spent on mobile platforms (apps, browser) in the USA is at 60%, desktop down to 40%, with a strong tendency towards further mobile internet growth.
  5. In Germany, the most used apps are Facebook (including WhatsApp and Instagram), Google (incl. maps, search, YouTube), Amazon, Ebay, Weather and a couple of news apps including Kicker (football). That… is pretty much it.

What do we event marketers make of these facts? Here are seven tipps:  Continue reading

Google conference app source code now available for free

Yesterday, Google revealed the source code information of the app they provided for their i/O conference 2014 on the Android developers blog. Hundreds of thousand people had downloaded the app.

In the blog post, Bruno Oliveira, Tech Lead of the I/O app project states “If one of the goals of the app is to be useful to conference attendees, the other primary goal is to serve as a practical example of best practices for Android app design and development.”

Google App
Picture taken from the Android Developers blog

Continue reading

Matchmaking Services by Deutsche Messe AG

In my new assignment (which kind of keeps me busy, as you can tell from the decreased number of blog posts recently ;-) I work closely with Deutsche Messe AG in Hannover.

Running some of the most important tech events like CeBIT and HANNOVER FAIR, they are quite advanced in offering top-notch digital services to exhibitors and visitors. You may want to check their mobile app technology (example: CeBIT app) to get an idea.

Using the app via wifi network connection on the fairgrounds is free-of-charge, while you have to pay for using the wifi network for other services like email or browsing.

An interesting service is Match-and-Meet. It allows visitors and exhibitors to connect before the show, meet up on site (even if you don’t exhibit at all at the show!) and stay in touch after the show. The online service costs 300 EUR for a year’s subscription (for exhibitors at Hannover events, non-exhibiting suppliers pay 600 EUR).

Here, you’ll find more about how to use the services as a visitor or as an exhibitor.

For an event prof, this is definitely worth taking a look at, because ultimately, we show organizers are all longing to offer platforms to connect supply and demand in an efficient and structured way – and by means of a working business model.

Connecting event participants – an interesting attempt based on a mobile app

Too bad I can’t go to TEDx RheinMain this time, because it coincides with the World Publishing Expo. Darren Cooper and the team around the TEDx community in Frankfurt have put together another great program around the topic “Everything communicates”. Here’s more information.

I also became aware that they are including WeLink in their event app. This is a social platform as a service for mobile apps that helps event participants find and connect with like-minded peers.

Will be interesting to follow how that works. Is it just for gadget-lovers or does it have a real value for event participants. Obviously, I am one of the first category, but it’d be interesting to see if that works on a broader scale.

What are your experiences with such tech-based tools?

Here’s a little video about WeLink, and here you can download the TEDx Rhein-Main app.

Mobile Apps: Native Vs Web App

This is a guest post by Tim Masterson, founder of conferencehandbook.com. Thanks, Tim, for the insight!

If you’ve done any poking around in the mobile world lately you may have heard the terms “Native App”, “Web App”  and “HTML 5” app.  They are all different ways to provide apps on your smart phone.  In the next few minutes I hope to demystify these terms a little for you, as well as share the tradeoffs of each technology.
What is the difference between Web App and HTML 5 apps?

Every HTML 5 app is in fact a web app.   But not every web app is HTML 5.  HTML 5 is basically a new set of tags that programmers can use to display your application in a web browser.  HTML 5 supports some really cool stuff like video and it also makes it easier for the developer to do asynchronous calls back to the web server.  The term “Web App” is used to mean any application that needs some form of a webserver to run.

  • Benefits:  Write once for all platforms.  Updates are server side and instantaneous.
  • Trade offs:  All logic is on the web server so network connectivity is required.  Users user the browser to access the app and not an app store icon.  Access to sensors (GPS, Cameras, accelerometers) is limited.

What is a “Native” app?

In general apps you get from the app store are “Native apps”.  A truly native app is written in a language and compiled down to an actual executable that runs natively on your phone with out a browser.  Some native apps, still connect to web servers to interact with data in the cloud or to receive updates.  In general Native apps have access to more sensors than web apps.  They also tend to run faster because more of the processing is done locally.  The draw back is in the cost to develop a native app.  To develop for many platforms you have to rewrite the app for each platform.  (Which explains why it took months for Android users to get their own version of Angry Birds).

  • Benefits:  Access to all sensors, the users address book, schedule, GPS.  Runs without network connectivity.  Graphics are cleaner due to hardware acceleration.  Available on the app store.
  • Trade offs:   Entire app must be rebuilt for each mobile platform. The user must initiate updates, unless the app is built to automatically update itself.

Some apps are in between

It is possible to write a native shell for a web app.  To do this the developer writes the bulk of the app in HTML 5.  Then they write a native wrapper for each platform that basically has an icon, and a page that holds a “Web View” the web view then calls back to the web server to get the app content.  This approach is great for some applications but still has it’s own set of trade offs.

  • Benefits:  Only the shell must be rewritten for each platform.   Users can access the app from the app store.  If use is in a place where network connectivity is good, the user will never know it is mostly a web app.
  • Trade offs:  The app is dependent on network connectivity.  The web app portion of the app will not be able to access the sensors.

The Bottom Line:

Know what you are signing up for when you pick a software vendor.  Understand how they are delivering your content and the tradeoffs associated with that method of delivery.  Make sure their method maximizes the size of your mobile audience while mitigating the tradeoffs.

About the Author:
Tim Masterson is the founder of Total Integrated Mobile, the makers of ConferenceHandbook.com.  A one stop solution for the mobile app for your next conference.